Gaming

Halo Fans Start to Hunt the Truth

You finished the fight. Now hunt the truth. We caught up with our dear old friend, the Master Chief, in 2012’s Halo 4, which kicked off the Spartan’s next, grand adventure to save humanity. In 2014, Halo fans received The Master Chief Collection, an HD compilation of Halos 1-4, as

NYCC 2014: LEGO Batman 3: Beyond Gotham

Few games out there can capture both a great sense of humor and great gameplay, but TT Games manages to do that with every iteration of their LEGO gaming franchise.  From the LEGO Star Wars games to LEGO Batman to LEGO Harry Potter to LEGO City Undercover to LEGO Marvel

Review: Nomino, the Social Game to Challenge Your Friends

Remember how fun game nights are? You and a few friends get together to play cards or a board game or some other group game (Taboo has always been a favorite of mine.) Nomino is a new social game that leverages your social network and the ubiquitous practice of posting photos online to recreate that “party game” feeling in an easy and fun way.

Nomino is a simple question-and-answer game, where a captioned image is your single clue to the answer. Players get to add their own Nominos to the database too in an effort to challenge (and possibly stump!) their friends and other players. That’s where the party game comes in: who doesn’t like to challenge their friends with trivia? You post a Nomino, share it on Facebook/Twitter/other social media, and your friends from everywhere and anywhere try to rise to the challenge. This is the first game I’ve played in recent memory that positively leverages social sharing as part of the experience (in contrast, too many games on iOS and Android require obtrusive, bothersome sharing in order to earn currency or something – whereas the point of Nomino is to share the challenge.)

Players earn coins for answering and creating Nominos. Those coins can be redeemed for free stuff from corporate partners, adding further value to play. As of this writing, there’s only one prize (a $10 Starbucks gift card), but I’m told that they’re working on other partnerships for more prizes. Currently, the coin redemption rate is pretty damn inflated (that $10 gift card is a whopping 240,000 points), so I’m almost worried at seeing the exchange rates for gear and prizes that are more than $10 in value. Regardless, these are prizes that can be earned simply by playing a free game – even if it’ll take quite a while to earn something really good, you can’t argue with free.

Hit the jump for the full review!

SDCC 2014: Sunset Overdrive

Now that the new generation of consoles have finally been released, this year’s E3 was devoted entirely to games.  Quite a few were worth keeping an eye on, but the game that piqued my interest the most was Sunset Overdrive — by a large margin. Compared to most of the

SDCC 2014: Halo: The Master Chief Collection

The Halo series continues to be one of the most popular video game franchises in history, spawning not only nine games, but also novels, comics, and even a live-action miniseries. After taking over the production of Halo games from Bungie in 2011, 343 Industries has strived to continue the Halo legacy and create new and exciting content for its rabid

ConnectiCon 2014: Jennifer Hale

Did you ever watch Where On Earth Is Carmen Sandiego?, Iron Man, or The Tick? How about Totally Spies, The Powerpuff Girls, or Codename: Kids Next Door? Or even spend a few hours playing the Metal Gear Solid, Metroid: Prime, or Mass Effect series? If you said yes to any

Review: Transistor

Sometimes you just have to figure things out yourself. In a gaming landscape dominated by mandatory tutorials, pop-up hints, and glowing markers, Transistor takes us back to a yesteryear-like feel from the very beginning, where it is up to us to figure out how we want to play in a vague structure of a story.

That became most obvious to me in the screen after the game’s title card, when the game expected me to press a button to start, whereas I was expecting a menu, a cutscene, or even a “press A to begin” to show up. I waited a good 15 seconds or so before I realized I had to press something, but it was the first time in recent history when I had to mentally check-in just to start the game. That was a good indicator of the world Supergiant Games had in store for me in their follow-up to Bastion.

Nothing is quite what we expect it to be in Transistor‘s world of Cloudbank. Right from the start, we’re introduced to our herione Red, a singer rendered voiceless after an attempt on her life, guided by her deceased protector, whose essence is now trapped in the Transistor, a sword-that-isn’t-a-sword. On face value, that sentence almost seems like an inherent paradox. But in Transistor, that story just works. It’s not about the minutiae; it’s just about a compelling starting point. The Camerata attempted to kill Red, and now she’s going to return the favor. Along the way, Red discovers the Camerata’s motivations and an even bigger threat seeking to swallow up Cloudbank, whose culture and presence is revealed through computer terminals, menu text, and Logan Cunningham’s omnipresent commentary as the Transistor, as opposed to direct exposition. That’s what gives weight and color to the otherwise simple plot and ultimately what makes us care.

Hit the jump for the full review!