Review: Star Wars: Rebel Heist #3

Three down, one to go. The caper begins to take shape in the penultimate issue of Star Wars: Rebel Heist as another familiar Rebel hero gets down and dirty in the galactic trenches. Directly following the action of issue #2, this month’s installment features the unnamed Stormtrooper who was extracted from Feddasyr

Roundtable Review: “Parks & Recreation,” Season 6

In Roundtable Review, two or more contributors review, pick apart, and critique those nerd properties that are just too big for one person to tackle — a comic book series, a television season, a movie trilogy, etc.

In our latest Roundtable Review, Tek and Dwight take a look back at the 22-episodes of Parks & Recreation, season six, examining the evolution of the characters, the season’s surprises, and the future of our beoved Pawnee, Indiana.


Rob Piontek

I remember watching the first episode of Parks & Recreation when it aired in 2009. The humor was very dry, none of the characters felt likeable (*cough* Brendanawicz…), and it was trying too hard to be The Office. Fast forward to 2013, and thanks to the benevolent goddess that is Netflix, a binge of Parks seasons 3-5 occurred, restoring my interest, which eventually turned into a genuine love for the series. (Seasons 1 and 2 were eventually viewed, but mainly because I’m a completionist.) Naturally, I wanted more, but as season 6 approached, I caught wind of the impending departure of Rashida Jones and Rob Lowe, as well as the absence of Chris Pratt for several episodes. With this in mind, I still dove headlong into the latest season, hoping that my love affair with the civil servants of Pawnee was not coming to a premature end. Thankfully, that was not the case.

 Even with an incomplete cast for most of the season, Parks maintained its own standard of quirkiness and utter hilarity. Right from the start, as the team ventures across the pond to England, even the British aren’t safe as Ben and Andy encounter Lord Edgar Covington (Peter Serafinowicz), in whom Andy finds a kindred spirit of ineptitude and obliviousness. This, of course, prompts Andy to stick around London for a time that perfectly coincides with Chris Pratt’s time shooting Guardians of the Galaxy (Serafinowicz also stars). The means of explaining away Andy’s sudden svelteness also falls right in line with what you’d expect from Parks. Evidently, cutting beer out of your diet allows you to drop 50 pounds and become an intergalactic outlaw all in the span of one month.

Hit the jump for the full Roundtable Review!

Review: Star Wars #18

The second arc of Star Wars from Dark Horse Comics comes to a close this month, wrapping up the Rebels’ adventure on the planet Arrochar. Leia’s nuptials are interrupted by Imperial wedding crashers, Han, Luke, and company spring into action, and Darth Vader himself, still under house arrest, is overseeing the operation. We’ve been

Roundtable Review: “Arrow,” Season 2

In Roundtable Review, two or more contributors review, pick apart, and critique those nerd properties that are just too big for one person to tackle — a comic book series, a television season, a movie trilogy, etc.

In our inaugural Roundtable Review, Tek and Dwight take a look back at the 23-episodes of Arrow, season two, examining the big plot points, the DC Universe connections, and the season’s major successes and minor failures.


Dwight Tejano

Damn, Arrow. Just… damn. After the events of last season’s “Sacrifice,” I had high hopes for Arrow’s sophomore season. When they announced that Manu Bennett, Colton Haynes, and Emily Bett Rickards were promoted to series regulars, my excitement for the new season hit fever pitch.

Now that the season has finished, I can comfortably say that it blew my expectations out of the water. I can’t think of a TV show in recent memory that truly maintained such a high level of quality (although not universally flawless) throughout each and every one of the season’s 23 episodes. The fact that it’s a superhero show only makes this more impressive, since it would have been easy to fall into certain tropes again and again. Instead, the writers and cast of the show chose to either subvert those expectations (the fact that the hero Oliver practically never has the upper hand against the villain Slade all season) or to lean into those expectations (Roy didn’t just go crazy, he went batshit insane) to avoid being dull.

Compared to its previous season, Arrow has been firing on all cylinders. Last year, Oliver (and, therefore, the show) was obsessed with crossing names off the list. That’s, arguably, a necessary evil, as the show undergoes the expositional growing pains of a brand new series, but I think most would agree that Arrow really took off during the latter half’s tete-a-tete with Malcolm Merlyn. This year, though, the writers capitalized on their strengths — focusing on the chess game between Team Arrow and Deathstroke to move the plot forward. Almost all of the events of the season tied in some way to the main conflict, expanding its overall scope and raising its overall stakes with each passing episode.

Hit the jump for the full roundtable review!